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Core values presentation - need clarification

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  • Core values presentation - need clarification

    Core values - The instruction provided to us just says that the team has to prepare a core values presentation for 2 minutes.
    Does that mean we just have to do a Core values poster and go over it? Or should we something creative just like the Project Presentation (like skit or poem etc)?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Re: Core values presentation - need clarification

    It could be anything you want to display some/all of the following (from http://www.firstinspires.org/robotics/fll/core-values ):

    "Core Values"

    "The FIRST LEGO League Core Values are the cornerstones of the program. They are among the fundamental elements that distinguish FIRST LEGO League from other programs of its kind. By embracing the Core Values, participants learn that friendly competition and mutual gain are not separate goals, and that helping one another is the foundation of teamwork.
    •We are a team.
    •We do the work to find solutions with guidance from our coaches and mentors.
    •We know our coaches and mentors don't have all the answers; we learn together.
    •We honor the spirit of friendly competition.
    •What we discover is more important than what we win.
    •We share our experiences with others.
    •We display Gracious Professionalism® and Coopertition® in everything we do.
    •We have FUN!"

    You could go over your Core Values poster, and possibly leave it with the judges for them to study later in their deliberations. You will get the poster back at the end of the competition. I would not use your "Core Values" time for the "Project" presentation -- they're judged separately.

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    • #3
      Re: Core values presentation - need clarification

      At least at events my team has attended, the Core Values judging session looked briefly at the poster. A majority of the time was spent by the team trying to solve a problem, presented live by the judges, they hadn't seen before, using provided objects. The judges wanted to see how the group approached the problem, and if all members participated in the solution. The problem was intentionally too large to complete in the time allotted, but it let the judges see the team's Core Values in action. Good luck!
      Jim Bates
      FLL Teams 71 & 13365
      FTC Team 9765

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      • #4
        Re: Core values presentation - need clarification

        JimInNJ had a good response. My experience over the last few years has been similar. On competition day the Core Values judging room goes like this:
        teams walk in and immediately are given a challenge to complete as a team. Team work is the goal and "completing" the challenge doesn't seem to earn more points in the eyes of the judges. Thinking of an original solution and thinking outside the box does. It's all about how the kids work together. The team then displays their Core Values board and explains it to the judges. The kids need to put together a tri-fold type board with 4 of the Core Values in certain places on the board. 'Discovery' top left, 'integration' bottom left, 'inclusion' top right and 'coopertition' bottom right. The center of the board is for any other Core Value(s) they want to share. Then judges are allowed to ask questions of the team. Usually "what kind of obstacles did you face", "What did you learn form your team members", "What was the most important thing you discovered", etc.

        It is important that the kids do practice challenges as a team and learn to share the load and not have 1-2 kids take over. Also it is very important for them to practice their poster style presentation. I aim to have the Core Values, project and robot programs mostly finished 1-2 weeks before to allow plenty of practice time to work on presentation skills. don;t spend an entire practice rehearsing presentaitons but they need to run through it at least a few times. And have them practice answering questions. Hope this helps.
        Last edited by rrasar; 11-18-2016, 01:44 PM.

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        • #5
          Re: Core values presentation - need clarification

          Our experience last year, with qualifiers and the state/regional competition, didn't include any kind of challenge being issued by the judges. It was actually kind of awkward because that was something we, as a team, practiced a few times. My kids walked in expecting the judges to give them a challenge, and I guess the judges were expecting the kids to start with a skit or presentation or something. Needless to say, this year, we're practicing both scenarios .

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          • #6
            A little late for this, but here's something to keep in mind for next season: The Core Values trifold or poster or hologram or whatever is required in your particular area is a TOOL. Some areas demand it, some don't, but -- and this is key -- the rubric itself doesn't say a single word about it. If your region says you must have one and you don't, it can make your team look unprepared, to be sure, but there really aren't supposed to be any rules on what you DO with it. As a World judge, I have seen teams say, "Here's our Core Values board," then set it down and do something completely unrelated, usually much better than explaining what they pasted to a board. If your team needs the tool, it can be very useful, and can be used creatively. Let your team decide what they want it to be for them.

            And that said, I'd like to mention one way to use the board that is of no use to anyone. It's when the team brings in the board and sets it down, and when I say, "Do you have a Core Values presentation you'd like to share with us," the team looks confused, looks at each other, and then turns AS A GROUP to face the board, not the judges, and starts reading what the board says to us. Make sure your team PRACTICES what they want to do in Core Values!
            Core Values coach for #1670, The Hyperbolics

            "First is not about fancy robots. The robot is the campfire around which the tribe gathers." -- Woodie Flowers

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