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  • Core Values Challenge

    I work with a rookie FLL team. I am told that as part of the core values rubric, judges give the team a challenge to complete as a team. As this could be literally anyth8ng, I would appreciate some tips on how your teams practiced for this aspect. Ofcourse, the first step is to instill the core values themselves but I am looking for some play or game ideas that would help with the challenge.

    thanks

  • #2
    You can practice activities similar to what they will see in the judging room. Here's a page with some good examples:
    http://flltutorials.com/CoreValues.html

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    • #3
      At a competition I judged in a few weeks ago, one team had a really good plan for the Core Values challenge. I explained it to my team and they love it. It is making their challenges run much smoother... For full credit, the team was the QuickBots from Beavercreek, Ohio, and the team is planning to credit the other team during their Core Values presentation this weekend.

      They have a plan of who is going to read the challenge to the team, so no crowding around and rubbernecking to see the page. Then they will break off into pairs (which they have already selected) to discuss their ideas for 30 seconds or so. Then the group comes back together and one kid from each pair (also planned ahead) shares the pair's idea. Then the whole team quickly votes on what they want to do. The whole process takes about 2 minutes, so not as much time to tackle the challenge, but they look GOOD while they get ready. They have become better listeners and their teamwork is much improved.

      Just thought I'd share, since it has helped my team so much. Hope this helps.

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      • #4
        All three judged events should have time for the team to present to the judges. For the project, this is formal and specific (five minutes guaranteed). For the robot design and core values, it may be different from state to state, judge to judge, etc. But in general, there is usually time given to the team to present *IF THEY WANT*. Trust me, your team WANTS to present to the judges. That is your time to tell the judges everything they need to know to fill out the rubric. You've judged Core Values before. If the team doesn't tell the judges how they apply FLL core values outside of FLL (as in, during a presentation), and the judges don't ask (perhaps because they didn't have time because one of the kids took a long time answering an earlier question), then the judges have no way of knowing what the team does in the way of applying FLL core values outside of FLL. So, if your region requires a poster, then they should be giving you time to present your poster. There is your best chance to tell the judges everything they need to know to mark your ask exemplary for each item on the rubric. And if they don't require a poster (Virginia-DC doesn't), they hopefully allow you to bring one in, and they should give you time to present it, hopefully at least two or three minutes. Also, train the team to answer quickly and precisely, so the judges have time to ask more questions. If the judges ever ask the team if they have anything else to present or share, always have a few short backup stories. "We helped some teams carry in their stuff this morning". "Our robot has this unique castor". etc. Keep the conversation going.

        Finally, explain to the kids how important the rubric is. Explain to them the number one job of the judges is to fill out that rubric. The kids' job is to make the judges job easy.
        Norfolk, Virginia, USA
        FLL Coach and Regional Tournament Head judge since 2014

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        • #5
          Originally posted by SkipMorrow View Post
          All three judged events should have time for the team to present to the judges. For the project, this is formal and specific (five minutes guaranteed). For the robot design and core values, it may be different from state to state, judge to judge, etc. But in general, there is usually time given to the team to present *IF THEY WANT*. Trust me, your team WANTS to present to the judges. That is your time to tell the judges everything they need to know to fill out the rubric. You've judged Core Values before. If the team doesn't tell the judges how they apply FLL core values outside of FLL (as in, during a presentation), and the judges don't ask (perhaps because they didn't have time because one of the kids took a long time answering an earlier question), then the judges have no way of knowing what the team does in the way of applying FLL core values outside of FLL. So, if your region requires a poster, then they should be giving you time to present your poster. There is your best chance to tell the judges everything they need to know to mark your ask exemplary for each item on the rubric. And if they don't require a poster (Virginia-DC doesn't), they hopefully allow you to bring one in, and they should give you time to present it, hopefully at least two or three minutes. Also, train the team to answer quickly and precisely, so the judges have time to ask more questions. If the judges ever ask the team if they have anything else to present or share, always have a few short backup stories. "We helped some teams carry in their stuff this morning". "Our robot has this unique castor". etc. Keep the conversation going.

          Finally, explain to the kids how important the rubric is. Explain to them the number one job of the judges is to fill out that rubric. The kids' job is to make the judges job easy.
          The team should view the Judges as their friends who have to go advocate for them during deliberation. This gives them the incentive to overcome the common fear of talking to adults and give the Judges as much ammunition as possible.

          Use the Rubric as a checklist but don't use it as a template. Even if the content of a presentation is great, it just appears too formulaic if the Judges can see that the presentation is proceeding in exactly the same order as the Rubric.

          My older son would "balance" the presentation by looking at what part of the Rubric each point in their presentation addressed. He would then shorten certain parts that got more than sufficient material so they could spend more time on areas of the Rubric that they didn't present as much material.

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          • #6
            Yes, good points. I especially like the idea of thinking of the judges as advocates/friends. And yes, use the rubric as a checklist, but not as a template. Be creative. If you are going straight down the rubric point for point, you are probably one of several teams doing that. Find a way to make it interesting and real. Have fun. But be sure to hit all of the points.
            Norfolk, Virginia, USA
            FLL Coach and Regional Tournament Head judge since 2014

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