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Core Values questions for preparation

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  • Core Values questions for preparation

    Hey all-

    I've never been a core values judge, but we're working on preparing our team for the qualifier. I'd like to start a discussion about the potential core values questions they might face.

    Here are some I've gathered from years past. My apologies for not being able to cite my sources (these are from my personal notes):
    • Tell me about the roles each of you had on the team, and how this worked?
    • What does Gracious Professionalism mean to you?
    • Can you give an example of Gracious Professionalism your team experienced? (giving and receiving)
    • Tell us about a problem your team had, and how it was solved?
    • Tell us what you have learned about FLL, and how you think it would help you in the future.
    • If you saw something happening to another team, and thought it wasn't fair, what would you do, and why?
    Last edited by korey99; 11-29-2018, 10:53 AM.

  • #2
    Here are a couple we get routinely:
    What makes a good coach? or How did your coaches help you this season?
    Tell me how you use the FLL core values outside of FLL.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jlrwi View Post
      What makes a good coach?
      My girls would not have a clue how to answer that one. I'd expect a puzzled expression followed by "Were we supposed to have a coach?"

      I only judged core value a few times the year it replaced "Teamwork". We didn't ask what gracious professionalism or coopertition meant. Instead we asked teams how they integrated FLL values into their daily lives and how they've shared their FLL experience with others. Those still kind of work with "inclusion" and "integration". There was a lot of emphasis on teamwork, possibly because only a few months earlier this was called "Teamwork Judging". All teams were asked the expected questions about how meetings are organized, who did what and who makes sure things get done. And of course the obligatory "Can you give me an example of a conflict you encountered and how it was resolved?"
      Last edited by Dean Hystad; 11-29-2018, 06:59 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Dean Hystad View Post
        My girls would not have a clue how to answer that one. I'd expect a puzzled expression followed by "Were we supposed to have a coach?"
        I figured it was a trick question. If a team went on and on about what their coach did it would hurt their score. Your girls would have given the "right" answer.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jlrwi View Post

          I figured it was a trick question. If a team went on and on about what their coach did it would hurt their score. Your girls would have given the "right" answer.
          Well. I don't think it was a trick question. And I don't think the correct answer should be: "Were we supposed to have a coach?" Some coaches are more involved in their teams than other coaches. The FLL Coaching Handbook specifically states:

          "As the Coach, your team needs you to give them guidance and provide structure, encouragement, and most of all, a fun experience. Lots of people make great Coaches: parents, teachers, engineers, college students, scout leaders, and more. You must be willing to meet with your team 1 to 3 times per week for about 8 to 10 weeks. You will need to acquire basic knowledge about the FLL Challenge, LEGO robots, programming, and research ..."
          Last edited by jkandra; 11-30-2018, 12:36 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jkandra View Post

            Well. I don't think it was a trick question. And I don't think the correct answer should be: "Were we supposed to have a coach?" Some coaches are more involved in their teams than other coaches. The FLL Coaching Handbook specifically states:

            "As the Coach, your team needs you to give them guidance and provide structure, encouragement, and most of all, a fun experience. Lots of people make great Coaches: parents, teachers, engineers, college students, scout leaders, and more. You must be willing to meet with your team 1 to 3 times per week for about 8 to 10 weeks. You will need to acquire basic knowledge about the FLL Challenge, LEGO robots, programming, and research ..."
            No, neither "what makes a good coach? or How did your coaches help you this season?" are trick questions. I've heard the latter multiple times as a coach, and have even used variations of it as a robot design judge.

            Most coaches of successful teams expend significant effort in multiple ways to help their teams. Teams with kids that are experienced, seasoned-FLL veterans should certainly need less guidance and assistance than rookie teams, but most of them will still admit they have coaches.

            When a team is preparing for a tournament, they should practice what will happen in the Project, Robot, and Core Values judging seasons. Asking the kids a list of questions they may encounter is a useful practice step. Ask your kids "how did your coaches help you?" and listen carefully to the replies. If you really don't like the answers, you may need to reconsider your coaching style. But it certainly is possible the kids just need some time to consider several possible answers and find ones that are accurate but also portray the team dynamics in a positive light.

            The judges are trying to use that question to help judge the team on the "Kids do the work" element of the Teamwork section for the Core Values rubric. The rubric looks for "appropriate balance between team responsibility and coach guidance". Your team should be striving for "good balance between responsibility and coach guidance" or "team independence with minimal coach guidance".

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