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Digital or hand-made CV poster

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  • Digital or hand-made CV poster

    While making CV posters, is it preferred to design one in Inkscape (or similar software) and print it or to manually write and draw everything?
    My question applies to Project poster and other artwork too.

    Thanks in advance,
    the eLaboranti team of Serbia.

  • #2
    As someone that has judged both project and CV (and RD for that matter), I can tell you that it has never been a matter of "Do we give the award to Team A or Team B with the sole criteria dividing them being one team did a digital poster and the other team did hand drawn". As long as it is neat, semi-professional (appropriate quality based on the team age), it does not matter at all what you use to create your poster. Use whatever the team wants to use.
    Norfolk, Virginia, USA
    FLL Coach and Regional Tournament Head judge since 2014

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    • #3
      Originally posted by SkipMorrow View Post
      As someone that has judged both project and CV (and RD for that matter), I can tell you that it has never been a matter of "Do we give the award to Team A or Team B with the sole criteria dividing them being one team did a digital poster and the other team did hand drawn". As long as it is neat, semi-professional (appropriate quality based on the team age), it does not matter at all what you use to create your poster. Use whatever the team wants to use.
      I been a judge multiple times as well and I fully agree. When judging, I use the posters to think of questions for the team. As long as I can see what they were trying to convey and the message clear enough then I'm okay. If the team is all 9 year olds and it's hand colored but I can see what they were trying to convey then that's okay. If a team is all 14 year olds and it's professionally printed then I'll ask who did it and accept their answer to move on. If the team is all 14 year olds and its really messy and hand colored and looks like they didn't care, my questioning will be directed towards try to quickly assess if they use and understand core values. If they then showed me they have great core values then my hunch didn't pan out.

      My point is again that the quality doesn't matter, but what I see might steer my initial line of questioning. In the end my purpose is to determine if the team follows and understands the core values. They get no extra points for whatever shape their poster is in. Frankly, they would likely get the same points if they walked in without a poster, though posters are optional in my region (but I've never judged a team without one).

      As for project materials, the goal is usually different (unless your region requires a project poster). That goal is to CLEARLY back up the information the kids are talking about in their presentation. If a judge wants confirmation as to what was said, they can use the presentation materials. Definitely don't rely on the presentation materials to communicate things outside of the verbal presentation as the judges don't have to consider it. But having easy to read materials helps the judges quickly understand what information is being shared. Keep it neat even if its not professionally printed.

      An interesting point is that my region encourages project tri-folds for sharing. Our last qualifier claimed the project tri-fold was required. Therefore we brought the tri-fold that the team spent 1 hour making and was mostly pictures from the season and diagrams and sat it on the side during project judging. The kids then held nicely printed presentation boards for the judges to see as the kids spoke. Never once did they reference the project tri-fold.



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