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2018-2019 Theme: INTO ORBIT

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  • 2018-2019 Theme: INTO ORBIT

    Looks like next year's theme has been announced:

    Hey FIRST LEGO League Teams! Are you ready to go INTO ORBIT (SM) in 2018-2019? The new theme has been announced, with a video teaser due out at the end of this month.

    Please see below.....

    INTO ORBIT (SM)
    THEME: Explore living in and traveling through space

    Coming August 2018

    Gather your crew and get ready to explore, challenge and innovate in the demanding and inspiring expanse we call space! The 2018/2019 FIRST LEGO League season requires you to work together to break out of your earthly constraints. Do you have what it takes to go INTO ORBIT (SM)?

    FIRST LEGO League challenges children ages 9 to 16* to think like scientists and engineers. During the 2018/2019 INTO ORBIT season, teams will choose and solve a real-world problem in the Project. They will also build, test, and program an autonomous robot using LEGO MINDSTORMS technology to solve a set of missions in the Robot Game. Throughout their experience, teams will operate under Core Values celebrating discovery, teamwork, and Gracious Professionalism.
    Last edited by EV3Lessons; 11-15-2017, 04:42 PM. Reason: fix forum-related character limits
    **************************
    EV3Lessons.com and FLLTutorials.com Founders
    FLL #51 World Festival Champion's 2018 (retired)
    FRC Not the Droids You Are Looking For (Rookie season 2020)

  • #2
    This makes me want to take a year off coaching.

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    • #3
      Far out! In my opinion, a space theme is overdue. I think teams should start calling up SpaceX for interviews. Too bad the BFR isn't ready to take the kids on a field trip.

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      • #4
        I should stay away too. I have a hard enough time keeping my fingers off the LEGO, and now they are going to add rockets!

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        • #5
          This has all sorts of interesting possibilities, although how anyone can make a functioning rocket out of LEGO escapes me.

          I'm hoping some team gets an experiment sent to the ISS.
          Kansas City Region Head Ref 2014-present
          KC Region coaches and teams can ask FLL robot game rules questions at [email protected]

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          • #6
            Originally posted by nedcook View Post
            This makes me want to take a year off coaching.
            This makes me excited for next season. I've been kinda meh on the water theme this season (probably because I'm not fond of my team's project). But space gets me excited. And it doesn't hurt that I know a bunch of people who could be possible experts for my team next year, everyone from space enthusiasts to educators at Space Camp to people working in the industry. Maybe I can use this as an excuse to go back to Space Camp...more research for my team during the off season! (Yes, Space Camp for adults is a real thing. A real, amazing, awesome thing! I'm told the camps for educators are cool too but I've never done that, just the week long kids and adult camps.)
            --
            Fort Worth Robotics - North Texas Region Team #455
            Technical coach, baker of the cookies, keeper of the time, transporter of the travel field walls, finder of the spare parts, maker of the pop culture references that only the other tall people understand.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MrGibbage
              As I put more thought into this, I am at a loss as to what the project scope will be. Think of a problem related to space travel or life in space and come up with an innovative solution? I wasn't a part of FLL in 2003 Mission Mars, but what were the project guidelines back then? All of the last four seasons were really pretty wide open for project ideas, but INTO ORBIT sounds pretty limited and advanced.
              Here's the Mission Mars challenge instructions for the project:

              http://firstlegoleague.nl/wp-content...ect_Engels.pdf

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              • #8
                I always thought it would be cool to work at NASA or SpaceX. That is until I worked at NASA and talked to my friends who worked at SpaceX.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by nedcook View Post
                  This makes me want to take a year off coaching.
                  I took this year off from coaching. Looks like my timing was poor. I'm not sure what kind of project the kids could do related to space.... unless their constantly building space fighter ships out of legos counts.

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                  • #10
                    I was disappointed to see this as a theme only because it seems to severely limit the available field trips a team might take to meet with experts and tour facilities (unless you live in specific cities, in which case you have a great advantage). This is always one of the most enjoyable and inspiring (when it comes to generating project ideas) part of the season for our team. Past topics have been broad enough that for the most part your geographic location wasn't a limiting factor in this regard. On the other hand, I can't wait to see the playing field next year.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TSrobotics View Post
                      I was disappointed to see this as a theme only because it seems to severely limit the available field trips a team might take to meet with experts and tour facilities (unless you live in specific cities, in which case you have a great advantage).
                      That's a good point I hadn't thought of. Think of the advantage that the kids on teams in Huntsville, AL have. They've got access to engineers who work on space craft (both current and retired), retired astronauts, people who work in the ISS control room and a whole slew of educators who work specifically with teaching kids about space exploration. And please tell me someone's going to pull some strings and set-up a video chat with the ISS for at least one team. Yeah, it's a heck of an advantage when it comes to the Project, but how cool would it be for those kids to have that opportunity!
                      --
                      Fort Worth Robotics - North Texas Region Team #455
                      Technical coach, baker of the cookies, keeper of the time, transporter of the travel field walls, finder of the spare parts, maker of the pop culture references that only the other tall people understand.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by timdavid View Post

                        Here's the Mission Mars challenge instructions for the project:

                        http://firstlegoleague.nl/wp-content...ect_Engels.pdf
                        Thanks for that! Do you have a link to an overview picture of the robot game board for that year?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nedcook View Post

                          Thanks for that! Do you have a link to an overview picture of the robot game board for that year?

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                          • #14
                            Oh boy! So different from anything I've ever seen.

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                            • #15
                              By Mission Mars FLL had already settled on a table size and the use of printed mats to guarantee all teams practiced with the same tables they would see at tournaments. The Mission Mars mat is similar to many other early challenges. To see something really different you have to go back further.

                              The 1998 FLL pilot program was a completely different kind of challenge. If I remember correctly it was as a maze with multiple solutions and you had to make choices between being safe and being fast. And safe really means safe because a mistake could lead to a tumbling robot on this three dimensional playing field. In 1999 the "mission" concept was introduced and you had to build a robot that could perform multiple tasks. I wish I could find an image from either of those seasons.

                              Things started looking more normal in 2000, Volcanic Panic. This was my first year in FLL and I still have the T-shirt. Volcanic panic was on the 4x8 table we all use today, but there was no mat. Those weren't used until 2002, City Sights. Volcanic Panic was memorable for the volcano cone that took up most of the north central part of the playing field. This was an actual 3D cone that poor coaches had to construct from wood and high density fiberboard. Even with good instructions building a cone is a challenging task and a lot of the tables that year were "interesting". Mats were still in the future and you painted your table surface and made lines using vinyl tape.

                              2001 Arctic Impact said goodbye to advanced woodworking skills and hello to pre-printed mats. These were provided by 3M and made everything so much easier. The mat was pretty spare, mostly a white background with some black lines. This was the first year when all field models were constructed of LEGO. I still have the polar bear and arctic researcher mini-figs. Mats continued to be quite spare until 2003 Mission Mars. Mission Mars introduced color, and lots of it. Luckily the color was red, which looked nearly the same as white to the RCX light sensors. The next few years had mats with solid blocks of color or subtle designs. That began to change with Smart Move in 2009. This was the first mat with a complex background, but it still had wide swaths of white surrounding all the interesting black lines.
                              Last edited by Dean Hystad; 11-17-2017, 03:24 PM.

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