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  • Rubber Bands

    Are rubber bands permitted? If so, do they have to be official Lego rubber bands/belts? If so, do teams practice with regular ones and swap out to "official" ones for the tournament?

  • #2
    Re: Rubber Bands

    Rule R01.

    As to the second question, a good question for team to think about the pros and cons.

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    • #3
      Re: Rubber Bands

      LEGO belts don't work very well as rubber bands. They intentionally aren't very stretchy. This was really driven home a few years ago when the lads built a long attachment that that used belts to provide some flexibility. They destroyed a dozen white belts in two meetings. After switching over to to the black rubber bands there was no need for any replacments.

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      • #4
        Re: Rubber Bands

        My understanding is that everything has to be official Lego components. A few years ago I had to track down official Lego string for my team's robot design. I have also discovered, it is better to use the same (type) materials in practice as they plan to use in competition.... little differences in type can make significant differences in performance sometimes.

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        • #5
          Re: Rubber Bands

          Originally posted by BentonBots View Post
          My understanding is that everything has to be official Lego components. A few years ago I had to track down official Lego string for my team's robot design. I have also discovered, it is better to use the same (type) materials in practice as they plan to use in competition.... little differences in type can make significant differences in performance sometimes.
          Depends on how much of that material you have and how perishable it was. Ideally you always want to use LEGO parts, but this can prove difficult when it comes to rubber bands/belts. The main reason the lads switched from LEGO belts to LEGO bands is because I cut them off. The belts are crazy expensive and they chewed through most of my supply at a couple of meetings. I wasn't going to drop a Benjamin to guarantee they had enough bands for practice and we didn't have the time to wait for delivery so I forced them to practice using the rubber bands my daughter used to tie up her hair. Those worked much better, leading the team to investigate the difference. Use belts when stretch is limited, use bands when you want to allow a lot of stretch.

          The main problem with using non-LEGO parts for practice is remembering to swap the LEGO parts back in on tournament day.

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          • #6
            Re: Rubber Bands

            Most definitely use LEGO rubber bands.
            As a ref, I have had to tell a team to switch out an office rubber band for LEGO rubber band. Luckily this FLL and a team gave them one. Gracious Professionalism.

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            • #7
              Old thread, but for those who come across it and want to find rubber bands, here is what Lego says about getting rubber bands: "You can find the replacement pack with eight rubber bands in white, blue, and yellow on LEGO: [with a link that the forum removes]."

              You can find them by going to Lego Education and searching for "LME Replacement Pack 8".

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              • #8
                Originally posted by SSISSI View Post
                Old thread, but for those who come across it and want to find rubber bands, here is what Lego says about getting rubber bands: "You can find the replacement pack with eight rubber bands in white, blue, and yellow on LEGO: [with a link that the forum removes]."

                You can find them by going to Lego Education and searching for "LME Replacement Pack 8".
                Though these are called "rubber bands", I think a more accurate description is "rubber belts". These parts are designed to work as pulley belts and have limited elasticity on purpose. I find the black rubber bands that have a rectangular cross section work better for storing energy, last longer, and you can get a pack of 25 from a large online retailer for thirteen bucks.

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