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  • How to rename a program?

    Hello, everyone. I feel like an idiot for asking this, but how does one rename a program? For example, if I had a project named Veggies, could I name the programs within it Corn, Peas and Carrots instead of Program 1, Program 2, and Program 3? I know it is possible because I

  • #2
    Yes. Double click on the program name (Program 1, Program 2) and you should be able to edit it.

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    • #3
      I was judging a tournament yesterday. A team opened a project and showed me a program named "Program". They opened a different project and showed me a program named "Program". When they opened a third project I asked them why they created a different project for each program and they weren't aware that multiple programs could be created inside a project. I am very disappointed with Minnesota program judging because this was the teams second tournament and their first programming judge let this pass. Criminal!

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      • #4
        It seems that I accidentally deleted part of my message. Huh.

        Tim Carey - oh dear, it was even more obvious than I thought it would be. Thank you so much.

        Dean - I have never heard of a team that brought a computer/laptop into Robot Design judging (I haven't heard a lot overall, so that's not saying a lot), but it sounds like a good idea. My team has always printed out screenshots of their programs and put them into their Engineering Notebook. But yes, that is most definitely criminal!

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        • #5
          We brought printouts too -- I wouldn't want to risk a computer malfunction when the kids only have a few minutes to talk to the judges. We also left the notebook with the judges so they could refer to it later during deliberations.

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          • #6
            All teams in Minnesota show programs on a laptop or tablet (ugh!) Viewing programs on a laptop lets me spot things like teams not knowing how projects/programs work. It also lets me look at code you may not want me to see because you didn't write it and have no idea how it works. That happened a couple times last weekend.

            The biggest advantage to viewing code on a laptop is I can turn what would be a painful 10 minute code review of one short program into a programming lesson where we write a my block or fix a problem with a mission or learn how help works.

            As for not knowing how to rename programs, I had to ask the forum for help too. It was the first post in my EV3 Helpful Hints thread.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Tim Carey View Post
              We brought printouts too -- I wouldn't want to risk a computer malfunction when the kids only have a few minutes to talk to the judges. We also left the notebook with the judges so they could refer to it later during deliberations.
              I had two teams walk in with laptops that were installing updates. Even if you usually display code using a laptop it is good to have printouts as a backup. I don't like judging programs without seeing any code. It stresses the parents out.

              I'm so glad we don't have "deliberations" in Minnesota. I want to be your judge, not your advocate.

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              • #8
                So what happens after you are done judging all the teams in MN? When I judged this year (project), we ranked each team based on the rubrics, then our deliberations were more comparing the top teams from each judging area to narrow the field for which teams advanced.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tim Carey View Post
                  So what happens after you are done judging all the teams in MN? When I judged this year (project), we ranked each team based on the rubrics, then our deliberations were more comparing the top teams from each judging area to narrow the field for which teams advanced.
                  We assign scores when judging. There may be some deliberation for distributing awards, but nornalized scores make picking the top N teams easy. We're not supposed to use scores, but it works a lot better than sorting and trying to make decisions based on second hand accounts.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Tim Carey View Post
                    So what happens after you are done judging all the teams in MN? When I judged this year (project), we ranked each team based on the rubrics, then our deliberations were more comparing the top teams from each judging area to narrow the field for which teams advanced.
                    During Qualifying tournaments in Minnesota, a judge sees all the teams (up to 16) in their judging group. The only real deliberation needed is when the same team is ranked first for awards in different categories (such as being first in Project and Core Values). Tournaments that have more than 16 teams (such as 32 or 48), are essentially treated as being multiple tournaments, with each separate 16 team judging group having its own winners.

                    At our state tournament, a judge will see about 10 teams in a judging out of the approximately 60 total teams. The highest ranked team in each judging group has a "call-back" judging session, where a group of judges sees all the top teams. Then those judges decide among themselves which team is the best.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by timdavid View Post

                      During Qualifying tournaments in Minnesota, a judge sees all the teams (up to 16) in their judging group. The only real deliberation needed is when the same team is ranked first for awards in different categories (such as being first in Project and Core Values). Tournaments that have more than 16 teams (such as 32 or 48), are essentially treated as being multiple tournaments, with each separate 16 team judging group having its own winners.

                      At our state tournament, a judge will see about 10 teams in a judging out of the approximately 60 total teams. The highest ranked team in each judging group has a "call-back" judging session, where a group of judges sees all the top teams. Then those judges decide among themselves which team is the best.
                      Even at the state tournament level we may deliberate, but I don't have to advocate. My fellow design judges or project judges ore whoever get to talk to all the "finalists" and form their own opinions. Teams are always their own advocate, and that is how it should be everywhere.
                      Last edited by Dean Hystad; 01-16-2019, 01:17 PM.

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