Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ordering programs within a project

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by Dean Hystad View Post
    If I have programs P1, P2, P3 and P4, I can put them in order in the Recent Programs tab by running P4 followed by P3, then P2 and finally P2. The programs will then appear as P1, P2, P3 and P4. To run P1 all I have to do is press the enter (middle) button. The list remains in the same order with P1 on top. To run P2 I have to press the down button and then enter. The order of program in Recent Programs is now P2, P1, P3, P4. To run P3 I press down twice and then press enter. The list is now P3, P2, P1, P4.. Finally to run P4 I have to press down 3 times and then enter. The list ends up in reverse order P4, P3, P2, P1.

    Did you notice the pattern? To run program N you press the down arrow N-1 times followed by enter. This can be done without looking at the display. To run the same mission over after a rescue you only have to press the enter button because the most recent program is always on top and always selected. Try it out. For ordering mission programs it works surprisingly well.
    And if the kids mess up the order during the run, they have to look REALLY closely at the small font to find the right program as the order will be messed up until they re-stage everything again.
    If the kids aren't capable of programming a sequencer, do what Dean said above.

    Comment


    • #17
      I was wondering if any teams have ever brought flashlights to the table to get a better read on the EV3 screen. Or is it just my old eyes that can't see the screen? I know if I was a robot driver, I'd need a flashlight. That's probably just one of the many reasons my team won't let me touch the robot.

      Here's to Lego developing the "EV4" with a brighter backlit LCD screen! I hope....
      Norfolk, Virginia, USA
      2014 World Class Learning (coach)
      2015 Trash Trek (coach, judge)
      2016 Animal Allies (coach, judge)
      2017 Hydrodynamics (coach, judge)
      2018 Into Orbit (coach, head judge)

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by SkipMorrow View Post
        I was wondering if any teams have ever brought flashlights to the table to get a better read on the EV3 screen. Or is it just my old eyes that can't see the screen? I know if I was a robot driver, I'd need a flashlight.
        My old team worked around this by displaying images instead of text on the screen. Each sequencer selection/choice produced a different full-screen image. The various images were easy to recognize and distinguish (there's a usability lesson in here) even from a distance.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by cschaffer View Post

          And if the kids mess up the order during the run, they have to look REALLY closely at the small font to find the right program as the order will be messed up until they re-stage everything again.
          If the kids aren't capable of programming a sequencer, do what Dean said above.
          Every team is capable of writing a sequencer program. They are a bit different than mission type programs (No move blocks! Hooray!), but the logic for even the most complicated sequencer is well within the understanding of any 9 year old. The tricky concept, and I was surprised by this, is using something the program can understand to represent the mission you want to run. Depending on what type of sequencer you write you probably want this program stand in to be something you can manipulate mathematically. I've worked with kids who have no problem doing line following or squaring to lines or any of the things robots do to solve missions have a really hard time understanding that the number 1 can be a stand in for mission 1 and that "Select Next Program" can be modeled using the equation "programNumber = programNumber + 1".

          Roughly half the mission sequencer programs I see have been copied from somewhere. I know this because they use the same variable names, the same block layout, and the same odd design choices. These teams are still saving precious seconds, so they get a little bump in their evaluation, but I am saddened they missed out on some fun programming. Face it, almost all mission programs are the same. Once you finish writing your "tools" the only difference between programs is the order of the blocks. Mission sequencers on the other hand are mostly switch blocks and loops with a smattering of display blocks and wait blocks and maybe even some sound blocks. Each part looks completely different than any other part.

          The main problem I see with mission sequencers is that teams write them at the wrong time. This is a great programming exercise you can work on BEFORE the challenge is released. I used a mission sequencer to teach my daughter's team how to program. They thought they were writing a music player, but it doesn't take much to convert a program that uses a menu to select a song to play into a program that uses a menu to select a mission to run, Most teams work on missions first and add the sequencer on at the very end. Often times this integration occurs a week before the tournament and the team is still working out bugs on tournament day. Teams also don't spend enough time practicing running the robot using the sequencer. Sure they can run all the missions in order, but did they practice interrupting mission 3 and running it again or skipping mission 4 because mission 2 messed up really bad and made mission 4 impossible?

          Comment


          • #20
            My kids learned to make the sequencer later in the season, building off of last year's non-working sequencer. We ended up with 4 launches from base, used the 4 direction buttons to run each launch and the center button to run the 3 second gyro recalibration program if needed. They used text instead of images, but wrote the text in MS paint and imported it as an image to make it bigger and easier to read. We fell into the trap of not running the programs through the sequencer until the last couple of weeks, but with 8 kids and 4 launches, they paired up and each kid knew where to place the robot, which attachments were needed and which button to press to start their mission. Worked out well for them. We trouble shot the issues that may have arisen during a match and lucky for us we didn't have any major problems on competition day.

            Comment

            Working...
            X