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  • #31
    That's funny. I have a similar problem teaching proportional control. I start by explaining "bang bang control" and why it's crude compared to "proportional control". Next week I'd ask them, "what type of control do we use?" A: "Ummm, bang bang control?"

    That name just sticks in their head. They never forget that even though I spend most of my time explaining why we DON'T want to use "bang bang". I tell them, try taking a shower using "bang bang". It's hot, cold, hot, cold... on average, your temperature will be perfect, right? No problem?

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    • #32
      Originally posted by WilliamFrantz View Post
      That's funny. I have a similar problem teaching proportional control. I start by explaining "bang bang control" and why it's crude compared to "proportional control". Next week I'd ask them, "what type of control do we use?" A: "Ummm, bang bang control?"

      That name just sticks in their head. They never forget that even though I spend most of my time explaining why we DON'T want to use "bang bang". I tell them, try taking a shower using "bang bang". It's hot, cold, hot, cold... on average, your temperature will be perfect, right? No problem?
      I use riding a bike. Do you turn the handle bars all the way left and right or do you only turn it them a little bit when you are almost heading where you want to go. Kids get proportional control. Not the math but the concept. They do not understand bang-bang control at all. It is only adults who think it is a logical progression to start with Left/Right than try Left/Center/Right and then maybe something like Hard Left/Left/Gentle Left/Center/Gentle Right/Right/Hard Right and then eventually replace all those horrid switch blocks with one multiplication.

      The most valuable thing about proportional control is not that it lets you follow a line or a wall, or forbid, a heading. The powerful thing is that here is the simplest of math equations making your robot look like it has eyes and a brain. Using math to model reality is so much cooler than using math to do calculations or solve word problems.
      Last edited by Dean Hystad; 12-14-2018, 05:29 PM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Dean Hystad View Post

        You can use the same math to convert rotation sensor readings to a robot heading. Below is a "Wheel Gyro" that calculates robot heading from rotation sensor feedback. It multiples the rotation sensor difference times Wheel Radius / Track to get the robot heading. It is fun to put this inside a program with a gyro and compare the two values. My gyro is slightly asymmetric, so I can actually get better readings using the motors than relying on the gyro.
        So what happens if the wheels slip? And how is this not relying on odemetry?

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Tim Carey View Post

          So what happens if the wheels slip? And how is this not relying on odemetry?
          It is odometry (just like using the gyro). And it doesn't work well when the wheels slip (just like when the gyro drifts). If it was something that made robots drive perfect I would take it to my grave..

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