Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Pollution Reversal- Did part of the mission drop out?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pollution Reversal- Did part of the mission drop out?

    The Challenge Reads:

    MISSION: POLLUTION REVERSAL — No matter where pollution originates, it usually finds its way into water. And of
    course, all plants and animals take in water. Since we depend on plants and animals for our food, pollution is a source of
    contamination, not just in what we breathe and drink – but also in what we eat. The yellow and blue balls represent pesticides
    on the farm and heavy metals in the water. While on their rings, they’re off the mat.
    SCORING CONDITION(S): Balls touching the mat are worth 4 POINTS EACH.


    It seems that you want the robot to knock the balls off the rings. But the preceeding description would make it seem like the action is then polluting the water and ground. It feels like the original plan would have called for removing the pollution entirely from the board. Not that I want to tell the team that the blue & yellow balls should be brought to base, but it struck me as a disconnect.

    Tom (Coach)
    The Blockheads

  • #2
    Re: Pollution Reversal- Did part of the mission drop out?

    From Rule 3:
    Do not interpret text based on your assumption about intent, or on how a situation might be in “real life.”
    Yes, it's counter-intuitive that the mission should be to remove pollution from a safe haven (on the black rings) and introduce it to land or water. But that's how the mission is written, so that's how it is to be done.

    You could bring the balls back to base if you want, but it's not required.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Pollution Reversal- Did part of the mission drop out?

      I to thought this was alittle off but hey it what the mission is and I'm sure the kids will love to knock the ball around. Im also sure some will remove it all the way to base because it might roll in the way of other missions..
      X.K.A.R.'s Teams
      Xenia Kids And Robots
      www.xkar.org

      Team 633 Robotatoes
      Team 634 Bro-ritos
      Team 6348 uhhh do you want fries with that

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Pollution Reversal- Did part of the mission drop out?

        Originally posted by Gary Voshol View Post
        From Rule 3:
        Yes, it's counter-intuitive that the mission should be to remove pollution from a safe haven (on the black rings) and introduce it to land or water. But that's how the mission is written, so that's how it is to be done.

        You could bring the balls back to base if you want, but it's not required.
        Maybe the air pollution is nitrogen dioxide and we crack it into completely safe nitrogen and oxygen.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Pollution Reversal- Did part of the mission drop out?

          Originally posted by Dean Hystad View Post
          Maybe the air pollution is nitrogen dioxide and we crack it into completely safe nitrogen and oxygen.
          The balls represent pesticides and heavy metals.

          Didn't-ja read the rools?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Pollution Reversal- Did part of the mission drop out?

            Several of this year's missions don't have scoring conditions that are obviously meaningful for the real-world counterparts of the models.

            I don't know if that is intentional, or possibly related to the number of different things going on--but it seems to make things simpler overall (at least to score!)

            For my personal understanding, I am treating the act of achieving the scoring condition as having the robot "do something about the situation".

            For example,
            - there may be different pollutants on the farm and in the water, so the robot "does something about it"

            - corn may get contaminated during the harvesting process, so the robot "does something about it"

            It will be less aesthetically pleasing when explaining the missions to someone, but it will have to do for me this year.
            Steve Scherr
            Referee and Judge, Virginia-DC, Maryland, and Ohio
            FLL Global Head Referee

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Pollution Reversal- Did part of the mission drop out?

              Maybe the point is how easy it is to cause contamination (bump a ball, dump a dispenser tray, etc.) but how hard it is to keep things clean (keep the dumped bacteria off the mat, wash off germs and bacteria into the sink, etc.).

              Linda

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Pollution Reversal- Did part of the mission drop out?

                Agree with the counterintuitive part, but moving the balls off sloppily can create problems...the pollution is removed, victory, but winds up in other places. Sometimes leaving the pollution undisturbed is more productive. That is a thought, don't know if it is a good one. We talked about already that we will want to bring the balls back to base for safety.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Pollution Reversal- Did part of the mission drop out?

                  I appreciate the attempt of the mission creators to link the missions to the Food Factor Challenge theme. However, I look to the Project to teach the kids good science and to the Robotics Challenge to teach the kids good engineering.

                  To that point, I throw out the mission descriptions. The goal of each mission is to get the points as described. If they want to know why, I say "them's the rules of the game."

                  There's little science to be had in turning the thermometer or timer knob, racing to catch the rats before the other team, or delivering bacterium one at a time to the kitchen sink.
                  Make things as simple as possible, but not simpler.
                  - Albert Einstein

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X