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  • Mission 12 scoring

    Hi, I'm being extraordinarily dense, but I just can't figure out how the 2nd example totals 20 points. I get examples 1 and 3. The only thing I can figure out is that the white/blue/tan stack is completely outside of the circle, but partly counts because level 2 bridges to the red stack. But, is it that only level 3 and 4 get the 5 points?

    It appears that "flat down" doesn't necessarily mean that units are oriented "base down". I.e., the units can be upside down or sideways. Is that correct?

  • #2
    That's a great question. I'm not 100% sure (but who is at this point), but our team mentor (team member from last year) suggested that it's considered all one stack because the white building is at least partially flat on top of the red making it all one structure partly in and four levels high. That's the explanation that makes the most sense to me.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by kaptainoakley View Post
      That's a great question. I'm not 100% sure (but who is at this point), but our team mentor (team member from last year) suggested that it's considered all one stack because the white building is at least partially flat on top of the red making it all one structure partly in and four levels high. That's the explanation that makes the most sense to me.
      Oh, that makes sense. I think the key phrase is "Independent Stacks".

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      • #4
        Independent is defined by rule 33 as "Not touching any equipment". I think the word "independent" is in there to indicate that the stack can't be on top of your robot and you can't build a platform or a container to keep the stacks in place.

        From the examples, it appears that "stack" means "a group of blocks where each of the blocks is resting on or under others". From the first and third examples, stacks can touch each other's sides without becoming a single stack. From the second and third examples examples, they can't rest on top of each other at all (even in a bridge) without merging into a single stack.

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        • #5
          Stephen, yes, very good points! As a first time coach, I have much to learn.

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